Browsing the archives for the Glencore tag

Google: A Tale of Two Cities – Part 2 – What To Do With Motorola?

in Beyond the Deal, Integrations, Mergers and Acquisitions, Post Merger Integrations, stakeholders

In this issue we will look at how Google’s integrating the mega-Motorola acquisition is (or is not) taking shape. Firstly, there are many questions about what Google’s strategic intent was when it acquired Motorola. Several months after Day One that intent is yet to be apparent. A second and related question is whether Google will draw from – or disregard – the integration practices that made it successful with smaller enterprises as it brings Motorola into its fold. At issue is whether Google can transform a faltering Motorola into the kind of value creating organization that will help it play a key role in going to its next level of development.
Once again the unforeseen has intruded into the Glencore acquisition of Xstrata. Qatar, one of the wealthiest sovereign states in the world, now has built up more than an 11 percent stake in Xstrata, making it the company’s second-largest shareholder. Does this mean that large scale acquisitions should not be pursued? Not at all. What is does mean is that the leading actors in these mega acquisitions are not in as much control of events as they would like to believe. Too tight focus on the deal and inadequate appreciation of stakeholders can misjudge the degree of significant difficulties at all stages of both the acquisition and the integration.

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Google Acquisitions and Integrations – A Tale of Two Cities

in Beyond the Deal, Human Capital Integration, Integrations, Mergers and Acquisitions, Post Merger Integrations, Springboards for a Quantum Leap Integration, Uncategorized

Google: A Tale of Two Cities (Acquisition and Integration-wise, That Is):

Google has two acquisition/integration “cities” or approaches. The first acquisition “city” is the one which Google has successfully evolved for its smaller acquisitions, and there have been many of them, since 2001. The second “city” is the one involving Google’s $12.6 billion mega acquisition and integration of Motorola Mobility. Regarding its smaller acquisitions, Google has a remarkable success story to tell. In the last five years, it has reshaped its approach from a an eclectic set of loosely thought through and opportunistic cluster of practices into a model for how to effectively search out promising target candidates and dynamically integrate entrepreneurial leaders and assets into the Google enterprise. This is the “city” we will be taking stock of in this month’s Newsletter.

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